Monday, March 29, 2010

Finding Out What's In It

A few weeks ago, Nancy Pelosi urged passage of the health care bill so we "can find out what's in it." Well, like digging through a dumpster, we are finding out.

David Hogberg lists the top 20 ways in which we will lose freedom under ObamaCare saying:
the bill is supposed to provide us with security. But it will result in skyrocketing insurance costs and physicians leaving the field in droves, making it harder to afford and find medical care. We may be about to live Benjamin Franklin's adage, "People willing to trade their freedom for temporary security deserve neither and will lose both."
Every item on his list supports his thesis such as this doozy:
13. If you are a physician owner and you want to expand your hospital? Well, you can't (Section 6001 (i) (1) (B). Unless, it is located in a country where, over the last five years, population growth has been 150% of what it has been in the state (Section 6601 (i) (3) ( E)). And then you cannot increase your capacity by more than 200% (Section 6001 (i) (3) (C)).
Paul Hsieh, analyzes the bill in The Real ObamaCare Fraud, demonstrating how "bundled payments", "accountable care organizations", and a legal black list of doctors, who refer too many sick patients to specialists, will provide bizarre incentives. He writes:
The overall effect of these policies will be a vicious “race to the bottom,” as doctors are rewarded for avoiding the sickest Medicare patients and/or doing as little as possible for them.
I can't imagine that anyone who understood the details of this bill would have supported it. This demonstrates the importance of philosophy in shaping these debates. People voted for this because it resonated with their deeper moral and epistemological premises which I analyzed in detail here.

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